Colloquia

Current Talks

30 minutes before the talk refreshments will be served in MSPB 350. If the talk is on Zoom, then the link for both the virtual "refreshments" and the talk is https://southalabama.zoom.us/j/5059668430

Join us to meet the speaker and the Mathematics & Statistics Faculty here at South!

Date Speaker Talk
Wednesday, October 26, 2022 at 6:00 p.m. in MSPB 140

Note the different time and place!

This talk is aimed at a general audience!

Thomas Mathew, University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)

Seventh Satya Mishra Memorial Lecture

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis: A Statistical Overview

Abstract: Identifying treatments or interventions that are cost-effective (more effective at a reasonable cost) is clearly important in health policy decision making, especially in the allocation of health care resources. Various measures of cost-effectiveness that are informative, intuitive and simple to explain have been suggested in the literature. Popular and widely used measures include the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), defined as the ratio between the difference of average costs and the difference of average effectiveness in two populations receiving two treatments. The ICER is interpreted as the additional cost per unit of effectiveness gained. Yet another measure proposed is the incremental net benefit (INB), which is the difference between the incremental cost and the incremental effectiveness after multiplying the latter with a "willingness-to-pay" amount. In the talk, I will provide a fairly non-technical review of the area of cost-effectiveness analysis, and its importance in health policy decision making. Some recently introduced cost-effectiveness measures will be discussed and examples will be given.

Refeshments will be served in MSPB 140 at 5:30 p.m.

Thursday, October 27, 2022 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Thomas Mathew, University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)

Reference Intervals and Regions in Laboratory Medicine

Abstract: Reference intervals are data-based intervals that are meant to capture a pre-specified large proportion of the population values of a clinical marker or analyte in a healthy population. They can be one-sided or two-sided, and they are widely used in the interpretation of results of biochemical and physiological tests of patients. A population reference range is typically expected to include 95% of the population distribution, and reference limits are often taken to be the 2.5th and 97.5thpercentiles of the distribution, which is especially meaningful if normality is appropriate. Usually the reference range is constructed based on a random sample and simply estimating the percentiles is clearly not satisfactory. This calls for the use of appropriate criteria for estimating the reference range from a random sample. When there are multiple biochemical analytesmeasured from each subject, a multivariate reference region is needed. Traditionally, under multivariate normality, reference regions have been constructed as ellipsoidal regions. This approach suffers from a major drawback: it cannot detect component-wise extreme observations. Thus rectangular reference regions need to be constructed based on appropriate criteria. The talk will review univariate reference intervals and multivariate reference regions, and the criteria that can be used in their construction. Both parametric and non-parametric scenarios will be addressed, and laboratory medicine examples will be used for illustration.

Thursday, November 3, 2022 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Scott Larson, University of Georgia

TBA

Abstract: TBA

Thursday, November 10, 2022 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Shelly Harvey, Rice University

TBA

Abstract: TBA

Thursday, December 1, 2022 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Paramahansa Pramanik, University of South Alabama

This talk is directed especially toward undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics or related subjects.

TBA

Abstract: TBA

Thursday, January 19, 2023 at 3:30 p.m. in MSPB 370 Julianna Tymoczko, Smith College

TBA

Abstract: TBA

Previous Talks

 

Date Speaker Talk
Thursday, September 29, 2022 Armin Straub, University of South Alabama

This talk is directed especially toward undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics or related subjects.

Gaussian Binomial Coefficients with Negative Arguments

Abstract: In the early 90's, Loeb showed that a natural extension of the usual binomial coefficient to negative (integer) entries continues to satisfy many of the fundamental properties. In particular, he gave a uniform binomial theorem as well as a combinatorial interpretation in terms of choosing subsets of sets with a negative number of elements. We tell this remarkably little known story and show that all of it can be extended to the case of Gaussian binomial coefficients.

This talk is based on joint work with Sam Formichella, a former undergraduate student at South.

For colloquium talks from previous years click here